skip to Main Content
Call 775-400-1322 For An Initial Consultation info@hrindemand.com

Are You Over Your Head in HR?

How Does Small Business Manage Human Resources? Who Has the Time!
Press Release

As a small business owner, have you ever wondered about such things as I-9s, paying employees correctly, or how to find good employees and keep them?

Typically, small businesses do not have a full-time, experienced human resources professional on their staff because it isn’t a practical expense. This leaves HR processes and policies to company personnel who might not have the experience and time to handle complex and changing employment laws and regulations. Managers may face employee issues that are challenging to address and go to the individual wearing the “HR hat” who may also be at a loss for how to handle an HR challenge.

HRinDemand works with clients who are in this exact position by providing an easily accessible hotline service. With the hotline, clients are just a phone call away when the unexpected arises and this preventative approach has resulted in avoiding lawsuits while increasing employee morale. When calling the HRinDemand hotline, confidentiality is ensured without judgement. With over 20 years of HR experience, the team at HRinDemand provides a knowledgeable sounding board helping businesses comply with employer requirements while helping to create a great employee experience.

“We have helped clients with everything from determining how to structure pay rates to an overhaul of their performance management processes to straightening out their I-9s. “This stuff is not for the wary or faint of heart,” says Melissa Marsh, Founder of HRinDemand. “We want to help small businesses navigate all the employer challenges they will face. Owners often wear so many hats, they rarely have time to think about HR…until it’s too late. We can help put preventive practices in place. Many of our clients have found the HRinDemand Hotline to be an invaluable resource. Our clients call when they’re stumped or just need a sounding board to bounce around ideas and make a final decision when handling employee needs.”

If you would like information about the HRinDemand Hot Line, contact HRinDemand.

The team at HRinDemand has helped clients navigate the following questions and more. Rest assured, if they don’t have the answers, they will find them for you!

Governmental Laws and Regulations

  • I haven’t really been keeping up with I-9s, what do I do now?
  • Nevada overtime requirements are confusing, how do I make sure I’m paying correctly?
  • I’ve always used independent contractors, is this ok?
  • Do we need to offer sexual harassment training?
  • Do we need to have our company policies in writing (even though we are a small company)?
  • Do we have the most recent Nevada and Federal labor laws poster posted in our office?
  • Is our employment application current with Nevada and Federal laws? Do we need to have an employment application?
  • Are our employee files correctly set up and more importantly, are they in compliance with government regulations? For instance, will the files pass an I-9 audit?
Read More

Manager and Employee Training – Why?


Managers & Employees Not Trained…What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
By: Melissa Marsh, MA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Training is often low on a company’s priority list…then there’s a problem…and then it’s too late. Avoid the need for damage control by ensuring your most valuable assets understand their roles and responsibilities. Managers and employees are often unaware that their actions may lead to big problems. Consider these questions when you are determining whether or not you need training in your organization:

  • Did a manager violate a Nevada or Federal employment law?
  • Did a manager ignore an employee when the employee mentioned that they hurt themselves on the job? If the manager didn’t ignore it, did they handle it correctly?
  • Did a manager neglect to offer leave under FMLA or ADA when an employee may have needed it?
  • Are managers asking illegal questions when interviewing candidates?
  • How do managers and employees resolve conflict?
  • How do managers effectively handle and document performance management issues?
  • When a new employee has been hired, how is onboarding handled?
  • Are I-9s and other new-hire paperwork completed correctly and will they hold up under a governmental audit?
Read More

Working with an HR Consultant Can Be Cost Effective

HR Consultants: A Cost-Effective Option for Small Businesses
By: Melissa Marsh, MA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

What does HR mean to you?

As a small business owner or operator, Human Resources or HR, probably equates with finding employees as quickly as possible and getting them on task right away.

What about after employees are hired?

Then, HR means dealing with small issues that pop up—and, then, turning to the Internet to educate yourself on tricky situations and hoping for the best.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

Is it possible to use an HR consulting company in a cost-effective way?

HRinDemand is constantly searching for and implementing easy-to-use tools for our clients. For instance, small businesses don’t need a large, full-blown Employee Handbook. HRinDemand offers an Employee Rulebook for those employers with less than 10 employees—and it is half the cost of a full employee handbook. This way, small businesses can comply with pertinent regulations and appear professional, knowledgeable and organized from the first day a new employee starts work.

Read More

Are National Background Checks Enough? Think Again!

THE LYNX LETTER | The Nevada-Sized Hole in the Security of Most Companies
By: Guest Contributor, K.J. Smith, President, Employer Lynx

The only thing worse than doing no background screening for your workforce is thinking you’re doing background screening, when in truth you’re not.

This, sadly, is the case for a vast number of businesses in Nevada. How could this be? Because they are trusting national background searches in order to learn about prospective and current employees.

Many of these national background screenings are offered by reputable, if not overly thorough, companies.

The reports are clean and professional. They are turned around in a short period of time. And in many cases, they come back to the employer giving the prospective hire a clean bill of health.

There is only one problem. Most of these national background searches don’t include vital information from Nevada.

That domestic violence rap? No. Doesn’t show. That dipping into the till? That fraud case? The time spent in the county jail? Missed, missed and missed.

This is because, by law, the State of Nevada doesn’t report to national databases. They are only one of a handful of states in America that don’t and unsurprisingly, Nevada’s independent spirit means they are included among them.

What does this mean? It means that if you’re hiring a Nevadan to fill a job in Nevada, then your national background screening is virtually useless.

The worst part is you think it’s doing the job.

There you are, unknowingly whistling in between sips of your coffee as you walk the hallways of your office, waving at many employees who should have never, ever received a company badge.

Read More

Your Employee Might Need Leave…Now What?

What is Required When Implementing Leave of Absence Policies?
By Charlotte Altamirano, HR Consultant

Navigating leave of absence policies at the workplace can be tricky – so tricky that the HR world is calling leave policies the “New Bermuda Triangle.” These policies can spark a lot of questions for employers and employees, such as:

  1. Who is eligible?
  2. What are the employer’s legal requirements?
  3. How does a serious health condition come into play with FMLA and ADA?

The Bermuda Triangle is known for its mystery, but leave policies don’t have to be! Starting with some quick facts helps demystify employer obligations.

Workers’ Compensation (WC) applies to all employers and employees.

Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) applies to any business with 50 or more employees. Employees are eligible for FMLA when they meet all three of the following criteria:

  • They have worked for the employer for at least 12 months
  • They have at least 1,250 hours of service with the employer during the 12-month period immediately preceding the leave
  • They work at a location where the employer has at least 50 employees within a 75 miles radius

If an employee is eligible for FMLA, they are able to take up to 12 workweeks in a 12-month period of leave.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to any business with 15 or more employees.

Employers need to be ready to handle each leave policy individually, even though the policies may overlap. Some of the most important considerations for employers include:

Read More
Back To Top